Friday, July 18, 2014
lonequixote:

Flowering Garden ~ Vincent van Gogh

lonequixote:

Flowering Garden ~ Vincent van Gogh

Thursday, July 17, 2014
mapsontheweb:

Crater Lake Oregon, Contoured by 500k elevation Points

mapsontheweb:

Crater Lake Oregon, Contoured by 500k elevation Points

Tuesday, July 15, 2014
theantidote:

Sunny Reprise by Leslie Allen

theantidote:

Sunny Reprise by Leslie Allen

Burn!

Burn!

tuzfold:

It’s hard not to see that the number of rockets fired from Gaza is more correlated with the number of Palestinian deaths than that of Israelis. It says a lot.
theeconomist:

Daily chart: A quantified look at the situation in Israel and Gaza


It doesn’t say a lot, actually. Things that are merely correlated almost never do. By definition. 
The Economist’s nice graphs and charts, while somewhat useful, neglect this much more vital aspect, which I will helpfully provide for you: "Israel targets terrorists and kills them, and avoids civilian casualties whenever possible, while Palestinian terrorists explicitly target Israeli civilians, but Israel’s Iron Dome missile defense system is nearly perfect at shooting those rockets out of the sky and has prevented a single death from those attacks". 
That says a lot more than any graph ever could. 
Don’t forget that Israel called off several attacks due to fears of hitting civilians. Palestinian civilians. Yet Hamas and Fatah hide among those same civilians — inviting attacks against them, which violates every rule of civilized warfare and a Geneva Convention Article or two — and actively discouraged them from heeding Israel’s warning this past weekend to seek cover to protect themselves. So who is exhibiting superior morals here? Hint: it’s Israel. 
It is naive and — dare I say it — politically partisan to ignore all of that and instead use simple charts and graphs to compare # of attacks, and # of deaths, when you have two starkly different strategies grounded in two starkly different moral universes. 

tuzfold:

It’s hard not to see that the number of rockets fired from Gaza is more correlated with the number of Palestinian deaths than that of Israelis. It says a lot.

theeconomist:

Daily chart: A quantified look at the situation in Israel and Gaza

It doesn’t say a lot, actually. Things that are merely correlated almost never do. By definition. 

The Economist’s nice graphs and charts, while somewhat useful, neglect this much more vital aspect, which I will helpfully provide for you: "Israel targets terrorists and kills them, and avoids civilian casualties whenever possible, while Palestinian terrorists explicitly target Israeli civilians, but Israel’s Iron Dome missile defense system is nearly perfect at shooting those rockets out of the sky and has prevented a single death from those attacks". 

That says a lot more than any graph ever could. 

Don’t forget that Israel called off several attacks due to fears of hitting civilians. Palestinian civilians. Yet Hamas and Fatah hide among those same civilians — inviting attacks against them, which violates every rule of civilized warfare and a Geneva Convention Article or two — and actively discouraged them from heeding Israel’s warning this past weekend to seek cover to protect themselves. So who is exhibiting superior morals here? Hint: it’s Israel. 

It is naive and — dare I say it — politically partisan to ignore all of that and instead use simple charts and graphs to compare # of attacks, and # of deaths, when you have two starkly different strategies grounded in two starkly different moral universes. 

Friday, July 11, 2014
Sunny with light missile cover in Tel Aviv this morning. I awoke to muffled thuds in the distance, Iron Dome shooting down Syrian-made missiles launched from Gaza, according to news reports. I attended the obligatory morning mixer for hotel guests at the bomb shelter, which fortunately lasted only five minutes before the all-clear sounded. […] Hamas has shot off hundreds of rockets (including one that landed a few kilometers from me up north in Zichron Yaakov while I had lunch there yesterday) without causing a single injury. Iron Dome has worked brilliantly. Traffic was a bit lighter than normal last night, but there wasn’t a free table at any of the hundred or so cafe terraces on Dizengoff St., Tel Aviv’s main drag. Sunny with light missile cover in Tel Aviv - David P. Goldman (aka “Spengler”)
Thursday, July 10, 2014
thejazzmessage:

theimpossiblecool:

Lee Morgan, jazz musician.

Happy birthday! (July 19th, 1938)

thejazzmessage:

theimpossiblecool:

Lee Morgan, jazz musician.

Happy birthday! (July 19th, 1938)

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

The Best of Buck Owens - Buck Owens

(Source: youtube.com)

mapsontheweb:

The British Empire in 1921

mapsontheweb:

The British Empire in 1921

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

All Things Must Pass (album) - George Harrison

If you like George Harrison or his work with the Beatles, and you’ve never sat yourself down and listened to this record, you owe it to yourself.

Several great songs, with a great vibe flowing throughout, about love, life, spirituality, and all the other things that were so good about late 60s and early 70s popular rock music. Big production where it makes sense, from Phil Spector, but he knew when to get out of the way and let the power of George’s music shine through.

And as I just learned today, from the comments on the YouTube video, George was just 25 when he wrote all of this epic music.

I bought this triple album after hearing one particular song from it, an album cut called “Awaiting on You All”, late one night on WXRT-FM in Chicago, probably in 1978 or 79. It entered constant rotation on my turntable for several years thereafter. And “My Sweet Lord” and “What is Life”, while still excellent songs, are not even the best songs on the record. The third disc is a live jam session from Concert for Bangladesh - I never paid much attention to it, because the rest of this record is so outstanding.

My faves: Behind that Locked Door, If Not for You (yes, the Bob Dylan tune), Apple Scruffs, Awaiting on You All, Beware of Darkness, Isn’t It a Pity, All Things Must Pass, Art of Dying, and literally, almost every song on the first two discs is the kind of thing you can listen to over, and over, and over again.

(Source: youtube.com)

Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth) - George Harrison

(Source: youtube.com)

Monday, July 7, 2014
In 1986, it took $100 to vaccinate a child from birth to age 18. Today, it costs $2,192. Because of this expense, insurance companies often don’t reimburse for the full price of a shot, and doctors lose money on each vaccination they give. As a result, many family doctors and primary care providers have stopped offering vaccinations to the general public, or even to longtime patients. Yet schools still require children to receive certain federally mandated vaccinations before students can matriculate. […] Some of the price increase represents real added value of new and better vaccines. As the [NYT] piece makes clear, however, corruption, greed, and rent-seeking also factor in. Doctors Stop Offering Vaccines as Costs Skyrocket