Thursday, April 17, 2014
mapsbynik:


Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population
A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.
Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading
Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.
Map observations
The map tends to highlight two types of areas:
places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.
Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.
Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.
At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.
Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.
Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.
In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.
Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.
::
Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.
I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?
Errata
The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.
::
©mapsbynik 2014 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Block geography and population data from U.S. Census Bureau Water body geography from National Hydrology Dataset and Natural Earth Made with Tilemill USGS National Atlas Equal Area Projection

mapsbynik:

Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population

A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading

Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.

Map observations

The map tends to highlight two types of areas:

  • places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
  • places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.

Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.

Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.

At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.

Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.

Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.

In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.

Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.

::

Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.

I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?

Errata

  • The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
  • Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.

::

©mapsbynik 2014
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
Block geography and population data from U.S. Census Bureau
Water body geography from National Hydrology Dataset and Natural Earth
Made with Tilemill
USGS National Atlas Equal Area Projection

Wednesday, April 16, 2014
davereed:

priddyproginoskes:

benfoldsone:

okaysizedbangtheory:

you done it

congration

I thought that said “You Bone it” at first

I as well thought that at first

Too bad cakes don’t have spell-checkers.

davereed:

priddyproginoskes:

benfoldsone:

okaysizedbangtheory:

you done it

congration

I thought that said “You Bone it” at first

I as well thought that at first

Too bad cakes don’t have spell-checkers.

(Source: stevesfriend)

Tuesday, April 15, 2014
demons:

Former prisoners liberated from the Dachau Concentration Camp cheer at the raising of the Stars and Stripes, April 1945.

demons:

Former prisoners liberated from the Dachau Concentration Camp cheer at the raising of the Stars and Stripes, April 1945.

Monday, April 14, 2014
vincentvangogh-art:

The Voyer d’Argenson Park in Asnieres, 1887
Vincent van Gogh

vincentvangogh-art:

The Voyer d’Argenson Park in Asnieres, 1887

Vincent van Gogh

mapsontheweb:

Africa at the dawn of World War 1, 1914

mapsontheweb:

Africa at the dawn of World War 1, 1914

Thursday, April 10, 2014
awwww-cute:

This is what happens when you try to eat beef jerky in a dog daycare

awwww-cute:

This is what happens when you try to eat beef jerky in a dog daycare

cupcakekatieb-eyecandy:

Julie Newmar

cupcakekatieb-eyecandy:

Julie Newmar

Monday, April 7, 2014

(Source: thefergiefergs)

Sunday, April 6, 2014
dendroica:

1937 dust storm hits Clayton, N.M.

May 29, 1937: The original Los Angeles Times caption reported:

This black roller dust storm is rushing toward Clayton, New Mexico. It was one of worst ever to strike that portion of southwestern dust bowl. A moment after this picture was taken the city was in darkness. The storm lasted several hours and was followed by rain. The interiors of houses were coated with dust and the outsides with mud. This picture was taken by an amateur photographer who happened to see the storm coming.

This photo was published in the May 29, 1937, Los Angeles Times.

(via Framework - Los Angeles Times)

dendroica:

1937 dust storm hits Clayton, N.M.

May 29, 1937: The original Los Angeles Times caption reported:

This black roller dust storm is rushing toward Clayton, New Mexico. It was one of worst ever to strike that portion of southwestern dust bowl. A moment after this picture was taken the city was in darkness. The storm lasted several hours and was followed by rain. The interiors of houses were coated with dust and the outsides with mud. This picture was taken by an amateur photographer who happened to see the storm coming.

This photo was published in the May 29, 1937, Los Angeles Times.

(via Framework - Los Angeles Times)

worldlyanimals:

Snowy Owl (BoomGoesTheCanon)
Friday, April 4, 2014

We send our children to be educated, at great cost, by morons and lunatics who celebrate persecution of males

If you haven’t been paying attention to the increasing degree of insanity shown by college administrators lately, and especially if you are a young man heading off to college soon, or the parent of one, you might want to start reading Minding the Campus and other blogs like it.

To pick just one example among many, here is Acquittal—and Denial—at Dartmouth by K. C. Johnson, who did such a good job exposing the Duke lacrosse scandal for what it was: a pile of lies that countless alleged “adults” not only failed to recognize but actively pursued.

Some of the details: 

As of late, the focus has turned to Dartmouth—which, somewhat unlike Duke and Yale, receives less attention in general from the national media. The starting point was the odd “rape culture” protest from last year. Then came the remark of the recently promoted Amanda Childress, who mused, “Why could we not expel a student based on an allegation? It seems to me that we value fair and equitable processes more than we value the safety of our students. And higher education is not a right. Safety is a right. Higher education is a privilege.”

Childress’ remark appropriately attracted a good deal of attention; a college spokesperson desperately, and ineffectively, attempted to walk it back. The episode also brought to light a disturbing lack of respect for due process even in a venue (college disciplinary tribunals) that generally disregards the concept.

Fueling the outrage was the arrest of a Dartmouth freshman, Parker Gilbert, for raping another Dartmouth student. Last week, Gilbert was acquitted—after five charges against him already had been dismissed, for lack of evidence, by first the prosecutor and then the judge who presided over the case. Criminal cases obviously have a higher burden of proof than the college disciplinary processes, but remarks by the jury foreman suggested that the case would have failed even under a preponderance threshold. ”(The woman’s) story of how the night played out, the evidence wasn’t there to support that,” said the foreman, in an interview with the Valley News. “To the contrary, it was more in Parker’s favor … There is tons and tons of evidence that just doesn’t add up.” The foreman added that the accuser was poorly served by people at Dartmouth who encouraged her to file the criminal complaint.

If only this were an isolated example. It isn’t.

Remember: we send our children to be educated, at great cost, by these loons. More and more we need to ask ourselves why. A culture that doesn’t just allow such persecution, but actively promotes it, is a clue that this is not just some random happening at a few schools - it is systemic, and toxic, and it needs to be stopped. 

And it needs to be stopped now. 

Thursday, April 3, 2014

tookmyskull:

This is the funniest (and possibly the most accurate) explanation I’ve ever read.

(Source: ask-innocence)

celiabasto:

100% ART

celiabasto:

100% ART

(Source: opticallyaroused)