Monday, October 13, 2014
claudemonet-art:

The Church at Varengeville, 1882
Claude Monet

claudemonet-art:

The Church at Varengeville, 1882

Claude Monet

Thursday, October 9, 2014
blondmisanthrope:

And prostate cancer kills more people.
But only men get prostate cancer.
So who cares, right?

blondmisanthrope:

And prostate cancer kills more people.

But only men get prostate cancer.

So who cares, right?

Friday, October 3, 2014
davereed:

9gag:

Every. Single. Time. #9gag

"Do you play miniature golf?"

davereed:

9gag:

Every. Single. Time. #9gag

"Do you play miniature golf?"

Thursday, October 2, 2014
vincentvangogh-art:

Peach Tree in Bloom (in memory of Mauve), 1888
Vincent van Gogh

vincentvangogh-art:

Peach Tree in Bloom (in memory of Mauve), 1888

Vincent van Gogh

Wednesday, October 1, 2014
You must remember to LOVE people and USE things, rather than LOVE things and USE people. Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen (via madamescherzo)

(Source: confessionsofsomeoneanonymous)

Monday, September 29, 2014
When Generation Wuss creates something they have so many outlets to display it that it often goes out into the world unfettered, unedited, posted everywhere, and because of this freedom a lot of the content displayed is rushed and kind of shitty and that’s OK—it’s just the nature of the world now—but when Millennials are criticized for this content they seem to collapse into a shame spiral and the person criticizing them is automatically labeled a hater, a contrarian, a troll. And then you have to look at the generation that raised them, that coddled them in praise—gold medals for everyone, four stars for just showing up—and tried to shield them from the dark side of life, and in turn created a generation that appears to be super confident and positive about things but when the least bit of darkness enters into their realm they become paralyzed and unable to process it.

Bret Ellis’ “Generation Wuss” Essay should be nailed to the door of every schoolroom and website.

Technically, I prefer “Generation Yay” but I won’t quibble.

(via richardrushfield)

"In a land of freedom we are held hostage by the tyranny of political correctness."

"In a land of freedom we are held hostage by the tyranny of political correctness."

(Source: donttreadonvirginia)

sept11memorials:

"Bretagne" Last known 9/11 Ground Zero search dog still lends a helping paw. #RescueDogs #NeverForget #Honor911

By Laura T. Coffey: TODAY
9/10/14

Some heroes boast muscle and brawn. Others possess steely nerves and impeccable timing. But this hero is a little different.

This one has feathery fur, a sunny smile, a calm nature and — for a dog — an uncanny ability to zero in on the people who need her most. She’s a 15-year-old golden retriever named ‘Bretagne’, and she’s believed to be the last surviving search dog who worked at Ground Zero in New York City after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. (One other surviving search dog from 9/11, a 15-year-old English springer spaniel named Morgan, worked at Staten Island.)

For the first time since the recovery efforts after the attack, Bretagne returned this week to the site of the former World Trade Center complex with her longtime handler and owner, Denise Corliss of Cypress, Texas. They were joined by NBC News’ Tom Brokaw, who will tell their story on TODAY on Thursday morning, Sept. 11.

Sunday, September 28, 2014
vincentvangogh-art:

Orchard in Blossom, Bordered by Cypresses, 1888
Vincent van Gogh

vincentvangogh-art:

Orchard in Blossom, Bordered by Cypresses, 1888

Vincent van Gogh

Friday, September 26, 2014
smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Cowboy Silhouette
Photo by Bill Stipp (Burleson, Texas, USA); Weatherford, Texas, USA

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Cowboy Silhouette

Photo by Bill Stipp (Burleson, Texas, USA); Weatherford, Texas, USA

Tuesday, September 23, 2014
vincentvangogh-art:

Les Alyscamps, 1888
Vincent van Gogh

vincentvangogh-art:

Les Alyscamps, 1888

Vincent van Gogh

Saturday, September 20, 2014
itsfunnytome:

Faith in Humanity Via

itsfunnytome:

Faith in Humanity Via

Friday, September 19, 2014

Arrest rate of NFL players committing domestic violence is … LOWER than the national average. Much, much lower. Huh.

blondmisanthrope:

meetingboy said: The statistic you cite is charged, not incidence. People with money with powerful friends don’t get charged as much. Witnesses and victims can be paid off.

Me: Not necessarily true. You have to remember, criminal justice in this country is more of a conveyer belt. While they do have money, that money affords them better attorneys that are willing to cut deals with prosecutors.

Prosecutors would prefer to have as much settled out of court as possible. The entire system is built around that end.

Such was the deal that Ray Rice received. And the prosecutor was quick to hold a news conference and point out that Mr. Rice was treated like any other first time offender in his jurisdiction. Offering to take the deal, rather than press his luck in court. Which would have been very time consuming and rather expensive.

Source: fivethirtyeight.com author Benjamin Morris:

Although there seems to be an endless stream of stories about NFL player arrests and misconduct, this is largely because there are a lot of NFL players (and they’re famous). At the league’s peak (during training camps), there are about 2,560 players attached to NFL teams (limit 80 each). As I’ll show, arrest rates among NFL players are quite low compared to national averages for men in their age range — but there are some types of crimes that trail the pack significantly.

This data was tricky to work with. For NFL arrests, the most comprehensive source I could find was the USA Today NFL Arrests Database, which goes back to 2000 and is updated through the present (I calculated rates based on the 2,560 players per year estimate). For national arrest trends, I used the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ Arrest Data Analysis Tool to find the arrest rates per 100,000 for the male population in the 25-to-29 age group (this group is the most similar to the NFL as a whole, where the average team age varies from 25 to 27 years old). The difficulty is that the two sources code offenses differently, so I had to make several grouping choices. There’s a full explanation of my methodology at the end of this piece.

As you would expect from a much more affluent group (e.g. the poverty rate among NFL players is zero), NFL players have much lower arrest rates than average — basically across the board:

image

image

Note that murder scores relatively high, but the raw numbers are extremely low (there are two in the database, though a third case — domestic in nature — resulted in suicide). But there are 83 domestic violence arrests, making it by far the NFL’s worst category — with a relative arrest rate of 55.4 percent.

Although this is still lower than the national average, it’s extremely high relative to expectations. That 55.4 percent is more than four times worse than the league’s arrest rate for all offenses (13 percent), and domestic violence accounts for 48 percent of arrests for violent crimes among NFL players, compared to our estimated 21 percent nationally.

Moreover, relative to the income level (top 1 percent) and poverty rate (0 percent) of NFL players, the domestic violence arrest rate is downright extraordinary. According to a 2002 Bureau of Justice Statistics Report covering 1993 to 1998, the domestic victimization rate for women in households with income greater than $75,000 (3.3 per 100,000) was about 39 percent of the overall rate (8.4 per 100,000), and less than 20 percent of the rate for women ages 20 to 34. That report doesn’t include cross-tabs, and it’s a little out of date (more current data is harder to find because more recent BJS reports on the issue do not include income breakdowns), but that sub-20 percent relative victimization among high-income households is consistent with the NFL’s 13 percent relative arrest rate overall (arrest disparities between income levels are probably even greater than victimization rates).

Indeed, perhaps the question of how the NFL should “police” its players is the wrong analogy entirely. This situation may be more akin to tort law than criminal law: If the NFL is capable of reducing any harm its players are causing — whether through harsher suspensions or other policies targeting behavior — it may have a legal (or at least moral) duty to do so.

Methodology: Now, I’m not experienced working with crime data, so I apologize if I grouped things unconventionally:

  • Assault: The BJS statistics make a distinction between aggravated assault and regular assault (the NFL data does not), but they don’t break out battery, attempted murder or manslaughter (NFL data does). So I’ve grouped all of these under “assaults” on both sides.
  • Sex offenses: The BJS statistics break down sex crimes into rape and non-rape, while the NFL arrest data is broken down by assault and non-assault. Therefore, I’ve combined those categories on each side into “sex offenses.”
  • Gun-related: Because the BJS data specifically says its gun data is of the carrying/possession variety, I’ve combined other types of gun offenses in the NFL data with their respective crimes instead of in their own group.
  • Prostitution-related: The NFL data breaks out pimping and solicitation, and the BJS summary data doesn’t, so I’ve combined these into “prostitution-related.”
  • Disorderly conduct: In the NFL data, it appears that some “disorderly conduct”-type crimes are listed individually, and some aren’t. I took my best guess and included everything that sounded like disorderly conduct, including: alcohol-related crimes, resisting arrest, criminal mischief, disturbing the peace, evading police and public intoxication.
  • Drugs: There were 11 cases in which a player was arrested in connection with something nonviolent while in possession of both drugs and guns. Because it was unclear to me whether all of those guns were illegal or not, I grouped these as drug offenses.
  • Domestic violence: The BJS summary data bunches domestic crimes with their respective counterparts. Because the vast majority of these are assault cases, I’ve broken down its assault data into domestic and nondomestic, based on another BJS report which states that approximately 21 percent of violent crimes are domestic. (How exactly that translates into arrests is very tricky; I tried calculating it from the huge National Incident-Based Reporting System data set myself and got a tentative number closer to 15 percent, but to be conservative, I’ve stuck with the 21 percent baseline for purposes of this analysis).
  • Finally, note, of course, I’m not saying that all of the players arrested are guilty, and only a small number are ever prosecuted or disciplined (which is also true to varying degrees for the general public).

Me: What this is, is the media fanning the flames over what is basically a nonstory. Feminist groups see an opportunity to get some free money from the NFL. So the bad press will go away. This is a standard political shake down. Nothing more. People such as Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton have made fortunes doing this.

This also serves as a diversion, so people won’t be paying attention to elected leaders in Washington right before a vital election period.

Before anybody gets their undies in a bunch over this, NO I do not condone beating up women, and NO, I am not excusing the behavior of Ray Rice or Adrian Peterson or whoever else you want to point to. But the way this has exploded, with several stories coming out at nearly the same time, even though some of the charges are older, and the way everybody from the public to the NFL itself to team ownership is just falling all over themselves to declare everybody guilty and take their careers away, and the overall lack of wondering how much of this is any of our damn business, it just has the stink of abuse of power and mob action all over it.

Be careful what you wish for. 

davereed:

moonstonebeginning:
A great addition to your garden or back yard. - Bee watering station. 

Bees need water just like we do but often times drown in open water. To make a bee watering station you can either do what is shown in the photo above and fill the bowl of a dog/cat watering jug with stones or you can fill a small dish with marbles and add water to that. That way the bees have something to land on!


I just got done destroying a large “mud bee” nest in my yard, along with a hornet’s nest in one of our honeysuckle bushes. I got stung at least seven times while mowing the grass one day, and as a result discovered the mud bees nest. Then,when I attempted to go into the house to do some first aid, several bees made it into the house with me, and I had to snap them with towels in my bathroom and hope they did not escape into the rest of the house. A rocking good time, that was.
So, while this might appeal to some people for some inexplicable reason, trying to attract more bees onto my property is not really on my to-do list right now. 

davereed:

moonstonebeginning:

A great addition to your garden or back yard. - Bee watering station. 

Bees need water just like we do but often times drown in open water. To make a bee watering station you can either do what is shown in the photo above and fill the bowl of a dog/cat watering jug with stones or you can fill a small dish with marbles and add water to that. That way the bees have something to land on!

I just got done destroying a large “mud bee” nest in my yard, along with a hornet’s nest in one of our honeysuckle bushes. I got stung at least seven times while mowing the grass one day, and as a result discovered the mud bees nest. Then,when I attempted to go into the house to do some first aid, several bees made it into the house with me, and I had to snap them with towels in my bathroom and hope they did not escape into the rest of the house. A rocking good time, that was.

So, while this might appeal to some people for some inexplicable reason, trying to attract more bees onto my property is not really on my to-do list right now.