Tuesday, April 22, 2014
During Mass on Easter Sunday, I cringed when the lector asked us to pray, “so that our generation will be the one to protect fragile Earth.” I’m sure most of the faithful didn’t even give the comment a moment’s thought, but it kind of bothers me that Christians are constantly guilted into giving money or acting upon what amounts to a belief system that does not accept God, but earth instead, as our utmost Savior and Healer.

The fact is, Earth Day is a holy day of the religion of environmentalism, and its key proponents are some of the most rude, holier-than-thou, condescending, religious zealots you will ever meet.

This is a pretty good rant about the constant nagging in Christian churches about taking care of the Earth, and I feel exactly the same way. 

I don’t want to hear environmentalism dressed up as faith in the Sunday prayers. I do plenty to help the planet already, thank you very much, and so does pretty much everybody else who is not dumping vast quantities of nasty toxins and chemicals into the nearest river.

Just give it a rest already, and quit worrying so much. The planet is fine, and it will be fine, even if CO2 has rocketed up to 400PPM from the previous 320PPM or whatever it was just a few short years ago. That’s 0.04% for you math-challenged types. It’s not a lot. It’s a trace gas in the atmosphere, and there is no credible evidence that it is causing trouble for us, or for the planet.

So Happy Earth Day. Whatever. Let’s not get too carried away with this whole “man is destroying the planet” thing, though, because it just isn’t true.Most of us who attend church do so to grow stronger in our faith, not to worship the Earth itself, as that is a bit too close to the kind of pagan worship and ritual sacrifice that existed before Christianity replaced that kind of barbarism with the radical idea that Love and Grace could be the centerpiece of a religion. 

This idea changed the world. Love and Grace. The very concept that we should be nice to each other, or the Golden Rule, is essentially due to the spread of Christianity. 

You’re welcome.  

ancap-curt:
We always suspected that the Fed govt was killing cattle and burying them…which is why they tased and beat the people who tried to stop their convoy to investigate. Now, the truth is coming out. This pic of a grave from Assembly woman Michelle Fiore. BLM’s Daniel love and his people will be going to jail -Guerilla Media Network
Nice going, Feds. Well played.

ancap-curt:

We always suspected that the Fed govt was killing cattle and burying them…which is why they tased and beat the people who tried to stop their convoy to investigate. Now, the truth is coming out. This pic of a grave from Assembly woman Michelle Fiore. BLM’s Daniel love and his people will be going to jail -Guerilla Media Network

Nice going, Feds. Well played.

fastcompany:

Sparkling Sidewalks That Reduce The Need For Street Lighting

There’s little need to be wary of a nighttime stroll though a park in Cambridge, England. During the day, particles in the surface of the path absorb UV light. In the evening, they release that energy again. The result is a beautiful effect that its creators call “Starpath.”

Read More>

Monday, April 21, 2014

vanfullersublime:

Indian Paintbrush

It’s the name of the red flower. No, it is not a Native American paintbrush.

This one suggests the painting style of early the impressionists, though most of them did not utilize quite so vivid a palette until a few years of absinthe abuse had taken hold.

Via Daniel J. Mitchell’s International Liberty blog

Via Daniel J. Mitchell’s International Liberty blog

Friday, April 18, 2014

Oh hey look - more climate alarmism. Yay.

fastcompany:

Spring might have just sprung, but there’s already a hint of a particularly cruel, hot summer in the air. It’s not surprising, especially not when you look at the persistent growth of weirdly warm weather in the United States since 1964.

Read More> 

That’s fascinating and all, but you do realize that the U.S. temperature data is hopelessly corrupted by poor siting and other flaws, such that 70% of the temperature collection stations are off by at least 2 degrees Celsius?

Putting thermometers next to buildings, parking lots, and airport runways will do that, and all in the warm direction, please note.

A meteorologist named Anthony Watts took it upon himself to certify the U.S. temperature data and found most of it is literally junk data. His blog WattsUpWithThat.com is must reading for anybody who wants to know what real climate science looks like. Guess what? He doesn’t believe in AGW, and what’s more, he has the evidence to prove it. Especially when you consider that the planet has not warmed in 16 years, despite rising CO2, which is all the way up to 0.04% of the atmosphere! Yikes! Sounds like impending disaster to me! Oh wait - no it doesn’t. It sounds like a manufactured crisis that stifles economic growth.

What kind of nut worries themselves to death about .04% of something, and yet ignores the other 99.96%? There is a line where insanity comes into the picture. 

Yes, pretending the planet is heating up due to man’s evil evil CO2 output is so much more fun and trendy. Also, wrong. 

We are wasting an ungodly amount of time and money on this silliness.

Besides, several people smarter than I, backed by actual science and proven history going back much more than 50 years, are betting on an increasingly cooler planet due to historic sunspot minimums fast approaching, especially given the fact that the planet is not warming today despite increasing CO2 levels worldwide. 

Thursday, April 17, 2014
mapsbynik:


Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population
A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.
Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading
Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.
Map observations
The map tends to highlight two types of areas:
places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.
Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.
Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.
At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.
Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.
Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.
In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.
Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.
::
Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.
I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?
Errata
The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.
::
©mapsbynik 2014 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Block geography and population data from U.S. Census Bureau Water body geography from National Hydrology Dataset and Natural Earth Made with Tilemill USGS National Atlas Equal Area Projection

mapsbynik:

Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population

A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading

Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.

Map observations

The map tends to highlight two types of areas:

  • places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
  • places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.

Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.

Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.

At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.

Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.

Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.

In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.

Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.

::

Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.

I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?

Errata

  • The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
  • Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.

::

©mapsbynik 2014
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
Block geography and population data from U.S. Census Bureau
Water body geography from National Hydrology Dataset and Natural Earth
Made with Tilemill
USGS National Atlas Equal Area Projection

Wednesday, April 16, 2014
davereed:

priddyproginoskes:

benfoldsone:

okaysizedbangtheory:

you done it

congration

I thought that said “You Bone it” at first

I as well thought that at first

Too bad cakes don’t have spell-checkers.

davereed:

priddyproginoskes:

benfoldsone:

okaysizedbangtheory:

you done it

congration

I thought that said “You Bone it” at first

I as well thought that at first

Too bad cakes don’t have spell-checkers.

(Source: stevesfriend)

Tuesday, April 15, 2014
demons:

Former prisoners liberated from the Dachau Concentration Camp cheer at the raising of the Stars and Stripes, April 1945.

demons:

Former prisoners liberated from the Dachau Concentration Camp cheer at the raising of the Stars and Stripes, April 1945.

Monday, April 14, 2014
vincentvangogh-art:

The Voyer d’Argenson Park in Asnieres, 1887
Vincent van Gogh

vincentvangogh-art:

The Voyer d’Argenson Park in Asnieres, 1887

Vincent van Gogh

mapsontheweb:

Africa at the dawn of World War 1, 1914

mapsontheweb:

Africa at the dawn of World War 1, 1914

Thursday, April 10, 2014