Thursday, April 24, 2014
neverwalkalonesupport:

Marine turned Maxim model
Veteran Marine Sgt. Shannon Ihrke is wearing a lot less than MARPAT these days. The 25-year-old can be found on the cover of this month’s military appreciation issue of Maxim magazine, sporting a star-spangled bikini and a salute.

A lot to like, right there! 

neverwalkalonesupport:

Marine turned Maxim model

Veteran Marine Sgt. Shannon Ihrke is wearing a lot less than MARPAT these days. The 25-year-old can be found on the cover of this month’s military appreciation issue of Maxim magazine, sporting a star-spangled bikini and a salute.

A lot to like, right there! 

Wednesday, April 2, 2014
ask-a-marine:

140325-M-KI464-005 - Students with the Association Student Body leadership class at Twentynine Palms Junior High School step into formation during their visit to Sergeant’s Course, March 25, 2014. The class was here to learn more about leadership from Marines in the course. (Official USMC photo by Cpl. Ali Azimi/ Released) by The Combat Center at Twentynine Palms http://flic.kr/p/mCxsA2

Junior high school kids learning about leadership from U.S. Marines … got to love that!

ask-a-marine:

140325-M-KI464-005 - Students with the Association Student Body leadership class at Twentynine Palms Junior High School step into formation during their visit to Sergeant’s Course, March 25, 2014. The class was here to learn more about leadership from Marines in the course. (Official USMC photo by Cpl. Ali Azimi/ Released) by The Combat Center at Twentynine Palms http://flic.kr/p/mCxsA2

Junior high school kids learning about leadership from U.S. Marines … got to love that!

Saturday, March 22, 2014
lonesurvivorfilm:

#PurpleHeartDay #ThankYou #Troops

lonesurvivorfilm:

#PurpleHeartDay #ThankYou #Troops

Thursday, March 13, 2014
milsotherapy:

Dear Soldier—
My dad was a soldier. He’s in heaven now. I found this $20 int he parking lot when we got here. We like to pay it forward in my family. It’s is your lucky day! Thank you for your service.
-Myles Eckhert, a gold star kid

 8-year-old Myles Eckhert had found a $20 bill in the parking lot at Crackle Barrel. He initially wanted to spend the money on a video game, until he saw a man in uniform along with his family waiting to be seated. Myles then changed his mind about the video game, “because he was a soldier, and soldiers remind me of my Dad”. He later then wrote a note to Lt. Col. Frank Dailey, offering to put the $20 toward his and his family’s meal.
“Army Sgt. Andy Eckert was killed in Iraq, just five weeks after Myles was born. All the kid has ever had are pictures and dog tags, other people’s memories and his own imagination.”. After paying for the military family’s meal, he asked his mom if he could go visit hid dad

He went and told his Dad all about his day.
Source


Terrific move, Well done, young man. Prayers for you and your family, and my sincere condolences on your loss.
Paying it forward …  

milsotherapy:

Dear Soldier—

My dad was a soldier. He’s in heaven now. I found this $20 int he parking lot when we got here. We like to pay it forward in my family. It’s is your lucky day! Thank you for your service.

-Myles Eckhert, a gold star kid

 8-year-old Myles Eckhert had found a $20 bill in the parking lot at Crackle Barrel. He initially wanted to spend the money on a video game, until he saw a man in uniform along with his family waiting to be seated. Myles then changed his mind about the video game, “because he was a soldier, and soldiers remind me of my Dad”. He later then wrote a note to Lt. Col. Frank Dailey, offering to put the $20 toward his and his family’s meal.

Army Sgt. Andy Eckert was killed in Iraq, just five weeks after Myles was born. All the kid has ever had are pictures and dog tags, other people’s memories and his own imagination.”. After paying for the military family’s meal, he asked his mom if he could go visit hid dad

He went and told his Dad all about his day.

Source

Terrific move, Well done, young man. Prayers for you and your family, and my sincere condolences on your loss.

Paying it forward …  

Tuesday, March 11, 2014
greatestgeneration:

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Band of Brothers’ “Wild Bill” Guarnere
William “Wild Bill” Guarnere’s first combat jump as a member of the 101st Airborne Divison was on June 6, 1944 - D-Day.  Mr Guarnere, who enlisted in 1942, was assigned to the 506th Parachute Regiment, 2nd Battalion, Easy Company, known famously as the “Band of Brothers.”
Mr. Guarnere earned his nickname for his somewhat reckless attacks on German soldiers during and after the D-Day invasion. He had developed a personal animosity for the Nazis after his brother Henry was killed by Germans in the battle of Monte Cassino. 
On June 6, Mr. Guarnere fired first on a platoon of Germans who were bringing supplies forward, killing most of them himself. Later in the day under the leadership of Lt. Richard “Dick” Winters, Mr. Guarnere was promoted on-field to staff sergeant and helped lead a platoon of 11 men against four German howitzers and their crews of 50. Even facing overwhelming numbers Mr. Guarnere and his troops won the day.
Several months later Mr. Guarnere was shot in the leg and placed in a cast to recover in a military hospital. Desperate to return to Easy Company, the sergeant painted his cast black with shoe polish and walked out of the hospital in extreme pain. He did not get far. Recognized by an officer Mr. Guarnere was court-martialed and demoted to private and forced to return to the hospital.
Able to earn an early release after threatening to go AWOL again, Mr. Guarnere returned to Easy Company in time for the last major German offensive - The Battle of the Bulge - in the winter of 1944. During the battle, Mr. Guarnere was hit by artillery while trying to save another soldier. He would lose his right leg and be sent stateside for the remainder of the war. 
When all was said and done, Mr. Guarnere earned a Silver Star (one of only two earned in Easy Company during the war), two Bronze Stars, and two Purple Hearts. 
Mr. Guarnere and the other members of Easy Company entered the popular consciousness with the 1992 publication of Stephen Ambrose’s Band of Brothers and gained even broader fame with the premiere of the HBO miniseries of the same name in 2001. “Wild Bill” was portrayed by Frank John Hughes in the series.
In 2007, Mr. Guarnere and fellow member of E Company, Edward “Babe” Heffron, co-wrote (with journalist Robyn Post) Brothers in Battle, Best of Friends: Two WWII Paratroopers from the Original Band of Brothers Tell Their Story, which became a best seller.
"Wild Bill" Guarnere died on March 8, 2014 at the age of 90.
At the time of his death, there are 19 members of Easy Company still alive.
Sources: Miami Herald and Wikipedia
(Image of William “Wild Bill” Guarnere, circa 1941-1944, is courtesy of letterstoeasycompany.tumblr.com)
Other members of the Band of Brothers featured on Obit of the Day:
Edward “Babe” Heffron - Passed away on December 1, 2013
1st Lieutenant “Buck” Compton - officer in E Company who later prosecuted Sirhan Sirhan for the murder of Sen. Robert Kennedy
Frank Perconte - The oldest living member of Easy Company when he passed away in October 2013
Capt. Richard “Dick” Winters - an interview I posted after his passing in 2011

greatestgeneration:

"Wild Bill"  Guarnere at the Museum back in 2011 with actor Frank John Hughes who played Guarnere in the Band of Brothers series.obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Band of Brothers’ “Wild Bill” Guarnere

William “Wild Bill” Guarnere’s first combat jump as a member of the 101st Airborne Divison was on June 6, 1944 - D-Day.  Mr Guarnere, who enlisted in 1942, was assigned to the 506th Parachute Regiment, 2nd Battalion, Easy Company, known famously as the “Band of Brothers.”

Mr. Guarnere earned his nickname for his somewhat reckless attacks on German soldiers during and after the D-Day invasion. He had developed a personal animosity for the Nazis after his brother Henry was killed by Germans in the battle of Monte Cassino. 

On June 6, Mr. Guarnere fired first on a platoon of Germans who were bringing supplies forward, killing most of them himself. Later in the day under the leadership of Lt. Richard “Dick” Winters, Mr. Guarnere was promoted on-field to staff sergeant and helped lead a platoon of 11 men against four German howitzers and their crews of 50. Even facing overwhelming numbers Mr. Guarnere and his troops won the day.

Several months later Mr. Guarnere was shot in the leg and placed in a cast to recover in a military hospital. Desperate to return to Easy Company, the sergeant painted his cast black with shoe polish and walked out of the hospital in extreme pain. He did not get far. Recognized by an officer Mr. Guarnere was court-martialed and demoted to private and forced to return to the hospital.

Able to earn an early release after threatening to go AWOL again, Mr. Guarnere returned to Easy Company in time for the last major German offensive - The Battle of the Bulge - in the winter of 1944. During the battle, Mr. Guarnere was hit by artillery while trying to save another soldier. He would lose his right leg and be sent stateside for the remainder of the war. 

When all was said and done, Mr. Guarnere earned a Silver Star (one of only two earned in Easy Company during the war), two Bronze Stars, and two Purple Hearts. 

Mr. Guarnere and the other members of Easy Company entered the popular consciousness with the 1992 publication of Stephen Ambrose’s Band of Brothers and gained even broader fame with the premiere of the HBO miniseries of the same name in 2001. “Wild Bill” was portrayed by Frank John Hughes in the series.

In 2007, Mr. Guarnere and fellow member of E Company, Edward “Babe” Heffron, co-wrote (with journalist Robyn Post) Brothers in Battle, Best of Friends: Two WWII Paratroopers from the Original Band of Brothers Tell Their Story, which became a best seller.

"Wild Bill" Guarnere died on March 8, 2014 at the age of 90.

At the time of his death, there are 19 members of Easy Company still alive.

Sources: Miami Herald and Wikipedia

(Image of William “Wild Bill” Guarnere, circa 1941-1944, is courtesy of letterstoeasycompany.tumblr.com)

Other members of the Band of Brothers featured on Obit of the Day:

Edward “Babe” Heffron - Passed away on December 1, 2013

1st Lieutenant “Buck” Compton - officer in E Company who later prosecuted Sirhan Sirhan for the murder of Sen. Robert Kennedy

Frank Perconte - The oldest living member of Easy Company when he passed away in October 2013

Capt. Richard “Dick” Winters - an interview I posted after his passing in 2011

Thursday, February 27, 2014 Wednesday, February 12, 2014
ask-a-marine:

Battle Rattle » Marine Corps names building for MOH recipient Cpl. Jason Dunham
February 11th, 2014 | Awards Battle Rattle Iraq Marines Medal of Honor | Posted by Gina Harkins, militarytimes.com
A fall­en cor­po­ral who is one of two mem­bers of the Corps to receive the Medal of Honor for hero­ism in Iraq and Afghanistan, will have a build­ing named in his honor aboard the base where Marines  …

Much respect

ask-a-marine:

Battle Rattle » Marine Corps names building for MOH recipient Cpl. Jason Dunham
February 11th, 2014 | Awards Battle Rattle Iraq Marines Medal of Honor | Posted by Gina Harkins, militarytimes.com

A fall­en cor­po­ral who is one of two mem­bers of the Corps to receive the Medal of Honor for hero­ism in Iraq and Afghanistan, will have a build­ing named in his honor aboard the base where Marines …

Much respect

Thursday, January 30, 2014
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Teenage Gun Smuggler
Irving Milchberg watched his father die right before his eyes when he was 15 years old. A Nazi officer discovered that the elder Milchberg was hiding bread, so he gave him a running start and shot him in the back. 
Not long afterward, Irving was arrested and put aboard a train to the Treblinka extermination camp. He managed to escape and returned home, only to find that his mother and sisters were gone. They would all be killed at Treblinka themselves.
Irving Milchberg was an orphan looking for a way to survive. The blue-eyed Jewish boy who was a resident of Warsaw’s infamous ghetto had to find a way to survive. So he, and a dozen or so other orphaned Jewish children, would pretend to be “Aryans” and sell cigarettes in Three Crosses Square. Given the nickname “Bull,” Mr. Milchberg would spend a year-and-a-half avoiding the Gestapo and informants in order to make a living while also smuggling food, supplies, and weapons into the ghetto. The square where they worked as literally surrounded by Nazis with buildings occupied by SS troops, German gendarmerie, German-led Hungarian troops, and a Gestapo office. 
On April 19, 1943, Mr. Milchberg had gotten word that the Nazis were going to “celebrate” the Fuhrer’s 54th birthday the following day by liquidating the ghetto. He made his way back from the square and informed his uncle, his only surviving relative. They hid with other families in a bunker as the Germans began their attack. During the fighting between the troops and the Jewish opposition, known now as the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, Mr. Milchberg recalled how his uncle insisted on celebrating the Passover seder: “You may die, but if you die, you’ll die as a Jew. If we live, we live as Jews. If you live, you’ll tell your children and grandchildren about this.”
Mr. Milchberg did live, but after the uprising ended in May 1943 he was captured and placed aboard a train to the Poniatowa camp. The train was accidentally switched on the tracks and Mr. Milchberg was able to escape once again. After receiving medical help for an injured leg from a Polish doctor who he knew before the war, Mr. Milchberg and the other cigarette sellers lay in hiding until the liberation of Warsaw by the Soviet Army in January 1945.
Mr. Milchberg fled to Czechoslovakia and then found his way to Austria where he stayed in a refugee camp. It was here that he learned to repair watches. In 1947 he was among 1,000 young Germans who were given permission to move to Canada. Settling in the town of Niagara Falls, he opened a jewelry and watch shop and work there until retiring to Toronto.
Irving Milchberg died on January 26, 2014 at the age of 86.
Sources: NY Times, Haaretz, and thejewishweek.com
(Image of Irving Milchberg, left, and another cigarette seller known only by the name “Conky” is courtesy of the New York Times)
Other posts of relevance:
Boruch Spiegel - Started the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising
Jean Julich - Member of the “Edelweiss Pirates” a youth-run German resistance group


An amazing story, an incredible journey.

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Teenage Gun Smuggler

Irving Milchberg watched his father die right before his eyes when he was 15 years old. A Nazi officer discovered that the elder Milchberg was hiding bread, so he gave him a running start and shot him in the back. 

Not long afterward, Irving was arrested and put aboard a train to the Treblinka extermination camp. He managed to escape and returned home, only to find that his mother and sisters were gone. They would all be killed at Treblinka themselves.

Irving Milchberg was an orphan looking for a way to survive. The blue-eyed Jewish boy who was a resident of Warsaw’s infamous ghetto had to find a way to survive. So he, and a dozen or so other orphaned Jewish children, would pretend to be “Aryans” and sell cigarettes in Three Crosses Square. Given the nickname “Bull,” Mr. Milchberg would spend a year-and-a-half avoiding the Gestapo and informants in order to make a living while also smuggling food, supplies, and weapons into the ghetto. The square where they worked as literally surrounded by Nazis with buildings occupied by SS troops, German gendarmerie, German-led Hungarian troops, and a Gestapo office. 

On April 19, 1943, Mr. Milchberg had gotten word that the Nazis were going to “celebrate” the Fuhrer’s 54th birthday the following day by liquidating the ghetto. He made his way back from the square and informed his uncle, his only surviving relative. They hid with other families in a bunker as the Germans began their attack. During the fighting between the troops and the Jewish opposition, known now as the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, Mr. Milchberg recalled how his uncle insisted on celebrating the Passover seder: “You may die, but if you die, you’ll die as a Jew. If we live, we live as Jews. If you live, you’ll tell your children and grandchildren about this.”

Mr. Milchberg did live, but after the uprising ended in May 1943 he was captured and placed aboard a train to the Poniatowa camp. The train was accidentally switched on the tracks and Mr. Milchberg was able to escape once again. After receiving medical help for an injured leg from a Polish doctor who he knew before the war, Mr. Milchberg and the other cigarette sellers lay in hiding until the liberation of Warsaw by the Soviet Army in January 1945.

Mr. Milchberg fled to Czechoslovakia and then found his way to Austria where he stayed in a refugee camp. It was here that he learned to repair watches. In 1947 he was among 1,000 young Germans who were given permission to move to Canada. Settling in the town of Niagara Falls, he opened a jewelry and watch shop and work there until retiring to Toronto.

Irving Milchberg died on January 26, 2014 at the age of 86.

Sources: NY Times, Haaretz, and thejewishweek.com

(Image of Irving Milchberg, left, and another cigarette seller known only by the name “Conky” is courtesy of the New York Times)

Other posts of relevance:

Boruch Spiegel - Started the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising

Jean Julich - Member of the “Edelweiss Pirates” a youth-run German resistance group

An amazing story, an incredible journey.

Saturday, January 25, 2014
demons:

USS Langley, the US Navy’s first aircraft carrier converted in 1920

demons:

USS Langley, the US Navy’s first aircraft carrier converted in 1920

Thursday, January 16, 2014
ask-a-marine:

131210-M-FS592-1330 - Sgt. Juan Ponce Jr., a drill instructor for Platoon 3009, India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, leads an incentive training session Dec. 10, 2013, to correct minor disciplinary infractions in his recruits on Parris Island, S.C. Incentive training consists of physical exercises administered in a controlled and deliberate manner and is a method drill instructors such as Ponce, 28, from Gadsden, Ala., use to instill discipline in their recruits. India Company is scheduled to graduate Feb. 14, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) by MCRD Parris Island, SC http://flic.kr/p/j39k8d

"Incentive training session"

ask-a-marine:

131210-M-FS592-1330 - Sgt. Juan Ponce Jr., a drill instructor for Platoon 3009, India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, leads an incentive training session Dec. 10, 2013, to correct minor disciplinary infractions in his recruits on Parris Island, S.C. Incentive training consists of physical exercises administered in a controlled and deliberate manner and is a method drill instructors such as Ponce, 28, from Gadsden, Ala., use to instill discipline in their recruits. India Company is scheduled to graduate Feb. 14, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) by MCRD Parris Island, SC http://flic.kr/p/j39k8d

"Incentive training session"

Wednesday, January 8, 2014 Tuesday, January 7, 2014 Tuesday, December 24, 2013

(Source: brianaistre)

Saturday, December 21, 2013

ask-a-marine:

Marine Corps 2013 Year in Photos - The year is coming to a close, and the Marines have seen everything from the assignment of women to combat units, to continued valor in Afghanistan. Relive 2013 through the Corps’ best images, this is the year in photos. See the rest from this year at the Marines Blog year in photos: http://ift.tt/18Bh3js Photos in the sequence from :30 to :56 have had motion added to them in post-production. by Marines

Friday, December 20, 2013

Sergeant Basilone was killed by an enemy mortar round at approximately 10:45 AM on February 19, 1945. He suffered massive abdominal wounds but lingered for approximately twenty minutes before succumbing from shock and loss of blood. Four Marines died from the same explosion. His last words were spoken to a Navy corpsman who attended to him following the explosion. That corpsman has vowed never to reveal those final words.
For his fearless leadership, his daring attack on the enemy bunker and successful capture of the first objective of C Company on Iwo Jima, he was awarded to Navy’s highest honor, the Navy Cross. He also received the Purple Heart for wounds received that day. Sergeant Basilone is buried in Arlington National Cemetery in section 12, grave 384.
…Like his mentor Chesty Puller, Sergeant Basilone has become a legend in the Marine Corps. At the entrance to his hometown of Raritan, New Jersey, a bronze statue of him stands silent guard, on a small median strip. The section of Interstate Route 5 that passes by Camp Pendleton in Oceanside, California, is called the Basilone Memorial Highway. His heroic exploits are recounted for every new Marine as a part of their education in the finest traditions of the Corps.
Sergeant Basilone, in his personal humility and unwavering dedication to the men who served with him, became a true hero of the American people during World War II. His courage eased their fears during many dark hours when the outcome of the war was uncertain. His cheerful, good nature in spite of his own psychological and physical suffering gave them hope. His tireless service, whether fighting or rallying support for the troops, helped Americans bear the hardships of wartime.
America owes a debt of remembrance to Sergeant Basilone and all the thousands of men and women who served to protect the country…to remember their sacrifices is to honor them.

Sergeant Basilone was killed by an enemy mortar round at approximately 10:45 AM on February 19, 1945. He suffered massive abdominal wounds but lingered for approximately twenty minutes before succumbing from shock and loss of blood. Four Marines died from the same explosion. His last words were spoken to a Navy corpsman who attended to him following the explosion. That corpsman has vowed never to reveal those final words.

For his fearless leadership, his daring attack on the enemy bunker and successful capture of the first objective of C Company on Iwo Jima, he was awarded to Navy’s highest honor, the Navy Cross. He also received the Purple Heart for wounds received that day. Sergeant Basilone is buried in Arlington National Cemetery in section 12, grave 384.

…Like his mentor Chesty Puller, Sergeant Basilone has become a legend in the Marine Corps. At the entrance to his hometown of Raritan, New Jersey, a bronze statue of him stands silent guard, on a small median strip. The section of Interstate Route 5 that passes by Camp Pendleton in Oceanside, California, is called the Basilone Memorial Highway. His heroic exploits are recounted for every new Marine as a part of their education in the finest traditions of the Corps.

Sergeant Basilone, in his personal humility and unwavering dedication to the men who served with him, became a true hero of the American people during World War II. His courage eased their fears during many dark hours when the outcome of the war was uncertain. His cheerful, good nature in spite of his own psychological and physical suffering gave them hope. His tireless service, whether fighting or rallying support for the troops, helped Americans bear the hardships of wartime.

America owes a debt of remembrance to Sergeant Basilone and all the thousands of men and women who served to protect the country…to remember their sacrifices is to honor them.