Sunday, February 2, 2014

ambient-entropy:

Stan Getz & Charlie Byrd - Desafinado (Verve Records 1962)

"Desafinado", a Portuguese word (usually rendered into English as "Out of Tune", or as "Off Key"), is the title of a bossa nova song composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim with lyrics (in Portuguese) by Newton Mendonça. The English language lyrics were written by Jon Hendricks and Jessie Cavanaugh. Another English lyric, more closely based on the original Portuguese lyric (but not a translation) was written by Gene Lees, and appears on some recordings as well. The version by Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd (from the album Jazz Samba) was a major hit in 1962, reaching 15 and 4 on Billboard’s pop and easy-listening charts, respectively; their definitive rendering also reached No 11 in the UK, Ella Fitzgerald’s version ranked number 38 on the charts.

I have the CD mentioned here, “Jazz Samba” - it’s great.

Friday, January 10, 2014
nprfreshair:

Fresh Air critic Kevin Whitehead celebrates drummer Kenny Clarke's incredible contribution to jazz:

January 9th marks the 100th birthday of drummer Kenny Clarke. One of the founders of bebop, Clarke is less well-known than allies like Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk, but his influence is just as deep.
That thing that jazz drummers do — that ching-chinga-ching beat on the ride cymbal, like sleigh bells? It gives the music a light, airy, driving pulse. Clarke came up with that, and that springy shimmer came to epitomize swinging itself.
Before him, jazz drummers kept time lightly on the bass drum. Kenny Clarke used bass drum sparingly, often tethered to his snare, for dramatic accents in odd places — what jazz folk call “dropping bombs.” He drew on his playing for stage shows, where drummers punctuate the action with split-second timing. Clarke kicked a band along.

image via drumlessons

nprfreshair:

Fresh Air critic Kevin Whitehead celebrates drummer Kenny Clarke's incredible contribution to jazz:

January 9th marks the 100th birthday of drummer Kenny Clarke. One of the founders of bebop, Clarke is less well-known than allies like Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk, but his influence is just as deep.

That thing that jazz drummers do — that ching-chinga-ching beat on the ride cymbal, like sleigh bells? It gives the music a light, airy, driving pulse. Clarke came up with that, and that springy shimmer came to epitomize swinging itself.

Before him, jazz drummers kept time lightly on the bass drum. Kenny Clarke used bass drum sparingly, often tethered to his snare, for dramatic accents in odd places — what jazz folk call “dropping bombs.” He drew on his playing for stage shows, where drummers punctuate the action with split-second timing. Clarke kicked a band along.

image via drumlessons

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

404-notsound:

shelterfromthenorm:

Charles Mingus - “Fables of Faubus”

A nice little tune from the jazz bass master, Charles Mingus.

Pure gold.

Wednesday, January 1, 2014

kdo:

Cat Stevens - Morning Has Broken (1971)

Morning Has Broken” is a popular and well-known Christian hymn first published in 1931. It has words by English author Eleanor Farjeon and is set to a traditional Gaelic tune known as ”Bunessan” (it shares this tune with the 19th century Christmas Carol ”Child in the Manger”.- Wikipedia

theniftyfifties:

Hank Williams — Jambalaya (On the Bayou) - 1952

(Source: kdo)

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

kdo:

Eartha Kitt - Santa Baby (1953)

Monday, December 23, 2013

kdo:

Fontella Bass - Rescue Me (Stereo) (1965)
Written by Raynard Miner / Carl Smith / Fontella Bass

”… Minnie Riperton provided background vocals, and Maurice White and Louis Satterfield, later of Earth, Wind & Fire, were on drums and bass respectively …” -Wikipedia

Saturday, December 21, 2013

superseventies:

Neil Young — Old Man - 1972

(Source: classicrockneverdies)

Wednesday, December 18, 2013 Thursday, December 12, 2013
nprfreshair:

Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the complete Chick Webb & Ella Fitzgerald Decca Sessions (1934-1941) anthology:

Drummer Chick Webb’s 1930s’s orchestra terrorized competitors in band battles and sent dancers into orbit at Harlem’s Savoy Ballroom. They could similarly explosive on record, but only rarely. Early on they did have some hot Edgar Sampson arrangements that Benny Goodman would soon turn into hits, like “Blue Lou” and “Don’t Be That Way.” But the Webb band also had an old school crooner, Charles Linton, with pre-jazz-age enunciation. In 1935 Linton helped draw a curtain over mannered singing like his, when he brought scruffy 16-year-old Ella Fitzgerald to Chick Webb’s attention. Her sound was streamlined and modern, about melody and rhythm more than emoting. Ella was unformed, but could read music and learn a song in a second. “This is it,” Webb said. “I have a real singer now. That’s what the public wants.” Music publishers deluged the band with mostly forgettable medium tempo swing tunes, but Ella could make something out of almost anything—such as “Sing Me a Swing Song (And Let Me Dance).” Her articulation was always precise, but as in later years a New York accent might slip out. 


Ella Fitzgerald = automatic re-blog!

nprfreshair:

Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the complete Chick Webb & Ella Fitzgerald Decca Sessions (1934-1941) anthology:

Drummer Chick Webb’s 1930s’s orchestra terrorized competitors in band battles and sent dancers into orbit at Harlem’s Savoy Ballroom. They could similarly explosive on record, but only rarely. Early on they did have some hot Edgar Sampson arrangements that Benny Goodman would soon turn into hits, like “Blue Lou” and “Don’t Be That Way.” But the Webb band also had an old school crooner, Charles Linton, with pre-jazz-age enunciation.

In 1935 Linton helped draw a curtain over mannered singing like his, when he brought scruffy 16-year-old Ella Fitzgerald to Chick Webb’s attention. Her sound was streamlined and modern, about melody and rhythm more than emoting. Ella was unformed, but could read music and learn a song in a second. “This is it,” Webb said. “I have a real singer now. That’s what the public wants.” Music publishers deluged the band with mostly forgettable medium tempo swing tunes, but Ella could make something out of almost anything—such as “Sing Me a Swing Song (And Let Me Dance).” Her articulation was always precise, but as in later years a New York accent might slip out.

Ella Fitzgerald = automatic re-blog!

Wednesday, December 11, 2013
amandamartinez:


     It sadly seems that we don’t have much time left with the great Ray Price, and I’ve been thinking a lot about what’s made The Cherokee Cowboy such a viable player in the progression of country music over the last several decades, and the legacy he will leave behind. 
     What I’ve had trouble grappling with when thinking about Ray Price, though, is trying to consider what country music would’ve been and would continue to be without him. See, Ray Price feels like a manufactured honky tonk or Nashville Sound machine, someone whose existence feels as inherent as country music itself. I guess this is what makes him such a big deal. Where would be be without the “Ray Price beat” or the Ray Price of the Nashville Sound era?
     What’s peculiar about Ray Price is that he pioneered multiple definitions for country. His 1956  hit, “Crazy Arms,” is marked as a pivotal moment in the creation of hard-knocking honky tonk music, yet, just a decade later, Price would turn his twin fiddles into orchestral violins, as he turned to the conversely soft and sweeping Nashville Sound, helping solidify the sub genre with songs like “Make the World Go Away,” and “For the Good Times.” 
     Price’s career trajectory takes note of the inevitable fact that popular music is an ever changing phenomenon. It should’ve come as a surprise to Price fans when, last year, the singer lashed out at Blake Shelton for the following statements:
     “Country music has to evolve in order to survive. Nobody wants to listen to their grandpa’s music. And I don’t care how many of these old farts around Nashville are going, ‘My God, that ain’t country!’ Well that’s because you don’t buy records anymore, jackass. The kids do, and they don’t want to buy the music you were buying.”
     Price responded to Shelton’s comments by proudly labeling himself “Chief ‘Old Fart and Jackass,’” misconstruing Shelton’s assertions as naive and arrogant, when in reality, the younger of the two country singers was merely expressing a view that Price himself had made an influential career out of adopting. 
     The whole Price/Shelton/Old Fart debacle really shed light on a long established fact about Ray Price: that he has long been a refreshingly stale staple of country music. Price is stale because his music has a way of feeling like it’s been around forever, like the earliest artifacts we turn to when we seek to define the initial creations of country music. He’s never seemed to project an appeal to youth, and this may be where the greatest difference between the Cherokee Cowboy and Blake Shelton arose. Yet, the authenticity and humility of his music is something that has and always will be apparent.
     Until the very recent past, the chance to see Price perform felt like one of the final remaining remnants of what seemed to be a primary source in the creation of country music— like holding a rifle that was used in the Civil War, or looking at an immigration form used by someone who passed through Ellis Island— Price felt like a real, living piece of history. I’m sorry to say that I never had the chance to see him, but his music will forever remain as an unquestioned chapter in the establishment of country music.

amandamartinez:

     It sadly seems that we don’t have much time left with the great Ray Price, and I’ve been thinking a lot about what’s made The Cherokee Cowboy such a viable player in the progression of country music over the last several decades, and the legacy he will leave behind. 

     What I’ve had trouble grappling with when thinking about Ray Price, though, is trying to consider what country music would’ve been and would continue to be without him. See, Ray Price feels like a manufactured honky tonk or Nashville Sound machine, someone whose existence feels as inherent as country music itself. I guess this is what makes him such a big deal. Where would be be without the “Ray Price beat” or the Ray Price of the Nashville Sound era?

     What’s peculiar about Ray Price is that he pioneered multiple definitions for country. His 1956  hit, “Crazy Arms,” is marked as a pivotal moment in the creation of hard-knocking honky tonk music, yet, just a decade later, Price would turn his twin fiddles into orchestral violins, as he turned to the conversely soft and sweeping Nashville Sound, helping solidify the sub genre with songs like “Make the World Go Away,” and “For the Good Times.” 

     Price’s career trajectory takes note of the inevitable fact that popular music is an ever changing phenomenon. It should’ve come as a surprise to Price fans when, last year, the singer lashed out at Blake Shelton for the following statements:

     “Country music has to evolve in order to survive. Nobody wants to listen to their grandpa’s music. And I don’t care how many of these old farts around Nashville are going, ‘My God, that ain’t country!’ Well that’s because you don’t buy records anymore, jackass. The kids do, and they don’t want to buy the music you were buying.”

     Price responded to Shelton’s comments by proudly labeling himself “Chief ‘Old Fart and Jackass,’” misconstruing Shelton’s assertions as naive and arrogant, when in reality, the younger of the two country singers was merely expressing a view that Price himself had made an influential career out of adopting. 

     The whole Price/Shelton/Old Fart debacle really shed light on a long established fact about Ray Price: that he has long been a refreshingly stale staple of country music. Price is stale because his music has a way of feeling like it’s been around forever, like the earliest artifacts we turn to when we seek to define the initial creations of country music. He’s never seemed to project an appeal to youth, and this may be where the greatest difference between the Cherokee Cowboy and Blake Shelton arose. Yet, the authenticity and humility of his music is something that has and always will be apparent.

     Until the very recent past, the chance to see Price perform felt like one of the final remaining remnants of what seemed to be a primary source in the creation of country music— like holding a rifle that was used in the Civil War, or looking at an immigration form used by someone who passed through Ellis Island— Price felt like a real, living piece of history. I’m sorry to say that I never had the chance to see him, but his music will forever remain as an unquestioned chapter in the establishment of country music.

Saturday, November 9, 2013

madamescherzo:

A Lovely Loop of Handel arias. And with that, I’m off to bed. In three minutes. I still got three minutes.

Thursday, October 10, 2013

thejazzmessage:

Born on this day: Thelonious Sphere Monk (October 10, 1917 – February 17, 1982) 

sorry-was-all-i-could-be:

Thelonious Monk - Bolivar Blues (Ba-Lue Bolivar Ba-lues Are)

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

superseventies:

Earth Wind and Fire — Shining Star - 1975 

(Source: 45andsingle)

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Jason Gray - “Good to Be Alive” - The Story Behind the Song